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Effectiveness of Negative Air Ionization in Removing Airborne Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV)

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org

Citation:  10th International Livestock Environment Symposium (ILES X)  .(doi:10.13031/iles.18-070)
Authors:   Amy La, Qiang Zhang, David Levin, Kevin Coombs
Keywords:   Swine, Air quality, Airborne disease transmission, Air ionization

Abstract. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes a disease that is endemic in the hog industry. Aerosol transmission of PRRSV is a possible way for outbreaks of PRRSV to occur in hog barns. It is critical for contaminated aerosols to be removed from ambient air entering hog barns to prevent airborne transmission of PRRSV. Chamber experiments were performed to determine if Negative Air Ionization (NAI) was an effective method of removing aerosols containing PRRSV from the air. The effectiveness of NAI was determined at ventilation rates of 34.0 m3 h-1 and 135.9 m3 h-1and aerosol generation rates of 14.8 and 33.0 ml hr-1 by assessing the aerosol concentration and PRRSV concentration before and after the activation of the NAI system. The aerosol concentration was measured with an aerosol particle size spectrometer. Air samples collected with Biosamplers were analyzed using Quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) to quantify the PRRSV concentration in the air. The effectiveness of the NAI system at reducing aerosol and PRRSV concentration was dependent on the ventilation rate of the chambers. The mean reduction in aerosol concentration was 96% and 68% to 78% for ventilation rates of 34.0 m3 h-1 and 135.9 m3 h-1, respectively. The mean reduction in PRRSV concentration was 90% and 68% to 73% for ventilation rates 34.0 m3 h-1 and 135.9 m3 h-1, respectively.

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