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CIGR Handbook of Agricultural Engineering, Volume V Energy and Biomass Engineering, Chapter 2 Energy for Biological Systems, Part 2.5 Hydraulic Energy

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org

Citation:  CIGR Handbook of Agricultural Engineering, Volume V Energy and Biomass Engineering, Chapter 2 Energy for Biological Systems, Part 2.5 Hydraulic Energy, pp. 123-137.  .(doi:10.13031/2013.36416)
Authors:   V. Schnitzer
Keywords:   Section Headings: 2.5.1 Water-Power Development, 2.5.2 Plant Layout and Civil Works, 2.5.3 Plant Equipment, 2.5.4 Decentralized Water-Power Development

First paragraph: Of all power sources, besides human and animal power, water power is the oldest and most important in the development of agricultural processing and industrial development. Deriving from early application in the flour mills, the power source had been utilized for other processes. The names of sawmills, grinding mills, hammer mills, and even steel mills indicate the role of this power source in our civilization. The rapid progress of electrification was then possible with the introduction of engines and turbines driven by fossil fuels; water power, independent in its location, still has a big share- and the biggest in renewable energy in todays energy demand. In spite of fast expansion of the electric grids, individual power sources in remote and agriculturally dominated areas still play the main role and foster development.

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