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CIGR Handbook of Agricultural Engineering, Volume III Plant Production Engineering, Chapter 3 Trends for the Future, Part 3.2 Precision Farming

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org

Citation:  CIGR Handbook of Agricultural Engineering, Volume III Plant Production Engineering, Chapter 3 Trends for the Future, Part 3.2 Precision Farming, pp. 598-616  .(doi:10.13031/2013.36361)
Authors:   H. Auernhammer , J. K. Schueller
Keywords:   Keywords: 3.2.1. Introduction, 3.2.2. Positioning in Precision Farming, 3.2.3. Concepts of Precision Farming Systems and Required System Elements, 3.2.4. Yield Mapping, 3.2.5. Soil and Weed Mapping, 3.2.6. Control of Field Operations, 3.2.7. Information Management

First paragraph: Crops and soils are not uniform but vary according to spatial location. Large-scale nonuniformities have long been countered with different cropping practices in different regions. But precision farming responds to spatial variability within individual fields or orchards. This leads to a more cost-effective and environmentally friendly agriculture by Increasing food production Optimizing the use of restricted resources of water and land Reducing environmental pollution Engaging the efficiency capabilities of intelligent farm machinery Improving the performance of farm management Precision farming concepts include: More accurate farm work by better adjustments of settings and by improved monitoring and control mechanisms Localized fertilizing on demand in accordance with the variability of soils, nutrients, available water, and plant growth Weed and pest control by localized crop production needs Automated information acquisition and information management with wellstructured databases, geographic information systems (GIS), highly sophisticated decision-support models, and expert-knowledge systems in integrated systems connected by standardized communication links (Fig. 3.1). Precision farming is not a fixed system, but rather a set of general concepts that may have different physical realizations with Different soil types under different climate conditions Different farm management systems and production levels Different mechanization solutions

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