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CIGR Handbook of Agricultural Engineering, Volume III Plant Production Engineering, Chapter 2 Mechanization Systems, Part 2.1 Systems Engineering, Operations Research, and Management Science

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org

Citation:  CIGR Handbook of Agricultural Engineering, Volume III Plant Production Engineering, Chapter 2 Mechanization Systems, Part 2.1 Systems Engineering, Operations Research, and Management Science, pp 521-536  .(doi:10.13031/2013.36355)
Authors:   C. B. Parnell , B. Shaw, B. Fritz
Keywords:   Keywords: 2.1.1. Optimization, 2.1.2. Time and Project Management, 2.1.3. Queuing Theory, 2.1.4. Simulation

First paragraph: The Engineering Council for Professional Development defined engineering (Whinnery, 1965) as the profession in which the knowledge of science (biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics) gained by study, experience, and practice is applied with judgment to develop ways to utilize, economically, the materials and forces of nature. Systems engineering incorporates a holistic view of the problem with mathematical tools to assist the engineer with decision-support information. These same tools are utilized in operations research and management science by consultants and managers. The Operations Research Society of America defined operations research as scientifically deciding how to best design and operate manmachine systems (Ravindran et al., 1987), usually under conditions requiring the allocation of scarce resources. The terms systems engineering, operations research, and management science refer to the same process, which is the application of systems analysis to gain a better understanding of the problem and make decisions that increase profit. Agricultural managers and engineers are required to make many decisions that impact the economic viability of agribusinesses during the course of their careers. It is assumed that the quality of management and engineering decisions will be improved by the appropriate and proper application and understanding of results of systems analysis. The goal of the application of mathematical tools is to improve the quality of management and engineering decisions. The knowledge of systems tools is not a replacement for experience and judgment but can be used to augment the basis for the decision making process.

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