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CIGR Handbook of Agricultural Engineering, Volume III Plant Production Engineering, Chapter 1 Machines for Crop Production, Part 1.7. Transportation

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org

Citation:  CIGR Handbook of Agricultural Engineering, Volume III Plant Production Engineering, Chapter 1 Machines for Crop Production, Part 1.7. Transportation, pp. 455-469  .(doi:10.13031/2013.36352)
Authors:   T. Taniguchi
Keywords:   Keywords: 1.7.1. Introduction, 1.7.2. Powered Farm Vehicles for Use in the Field, 1.7.3. Motor Trucks (Used for Local and Long-distance Transport), 1.7.4. Trailers, 1.7.5. Loaders, 1.7.6. Monorails

First paragraph: It can be said that agriculture is an industry of conveyance, because various types of vehicles are required for transportation tasks ranging from carrying fertilizer and chemicals to getting the actual crops to market. It is not always evident that a high proportion of the work on farms consists of transporting products and supplies such as feed, manure, and other production aids. The task of moving this varied type and amount of material requires different and specialized vehicles. A look at the history of farm mechanization in Japan before the advent of the tractor and power tiller reveals that compact three- or four-wheel trucks were prevalent. This suggests that even farmers whose main products were grain crops, with a volume smaller than that of potatoes and other root crops, were looking for ways to make the task of transportation less labor-intensive and more effi- cient. The increase in female and aged labor shouldering the physically demanding task of farming, coupled with advances in science, technology, and environmental changes, means that methods of transportation also must change to keep step. The technology described in this chapter refers mainly to East Asia, Japan, and South Korea.

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