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CIGR Handbook of Agricultural Engineering, Volume III Plant Production Engineering, Chapter 1 Machines for Crop Production, 1.6. Harvesters and Threshers, Part 1.6.8-1.6.10 Harvesters and Threshers: Forage Crops

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org

Citation:  CIGR Handbook of Agricultural Engineering, Volume III Plant Production Engineering, Chapter 1 Machines for Crop Production, 1.6. Harvesters and Threshers, Part 1.6.8-1.6.10 Harvesters and Threshers: Forage Crops, pp. 348-381  .(doi:10.13031/2013.36348)
Authors:   A. G.. Cavalchini
Keywords:   Keywords: 1.6.8. Foreword, 1.6.9. Meadow-Type Forages, 1.6.10. Forage Cereals

First paragraph: Forage crops can basically be divided into two main categories: meadow-type forages and forage cereals. Although meadow-type foragesgrasses and legumescontinue to play a fundamental role in livestock farming on a global scale, in the high intensive agricultural systems they have been largely replaced by whole-plant harvesting of cereal crops (maize, barley, wheat) (Fig. 1.306) which permit: A substantial simplification of the harvest mechanization chain. Generally a much lower cost per forage unit (FU) and higher unit productivity (UF/ha). A more consistent level of forage quality, with a higher energy content, which is therefore better suited to modern methods of feeding beef and dairy cattle. In connectionwith this last point, it should be noted that feed-transformation efficiency has improved considerably over the last decades in all those husbandry systems that have introduced rations with increasingly high energy content, both in unit terms (kJ/kg of feed) and absolute terms (kg of feed/day) (Table 1.60). In less developed countries, where the cost of cereals remains high and there is competition between humans and animals for food, grazing is still the primary resource and feed supplementation is often limited to byproducts.

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