Click on “Download PDF” for the PDF version or on the title for the HTML version.


If you are not an ASABE member or if your employer has not arranged for access to the full-text, Click here for options.

CIGR Handbook of Agricultural Engineering, Volume III Plant Production Engineering, Chapter 1 Machines for Crop Production, 1.6 Harvesters and Threshers, Part 1.6.1-1.6.7 Harvesters and Threshers: Grain

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org

Citation:  CIGR Handbook of Agricultural Engineering, Volume III Plant Production Engineering, Chapter 1 Machines for Crop Production, 1.6A Harvesters and Threshers, Part 1.6.1-1.6.7 Harvesters and Threshers: Grain, pp. 311-347  .(doi:10.13031/2013.36347)
Authors:   H. D. Kutzbach, G.. R. Quick
Keywords:   Keywords: 1.6.1. Functional Components of Combine Harvesters, 1.6.2. Threshing and Separation, 1.6.3. Combine Harvester Performance, 1.6.4. Information and Control Systems, 1.6.5. Combine Attachments and Variants, 1.6.6. Rice Harvesting, 1.6.7. Power Threshers as Precursors of Mechanization,

First paragraph: Combine harvesters equipped with the right attachments can harvest grains and seeds of a wide range of types and sizes, from mustard seeds to broad beans, from groundhugging clovers to corn over 2m tall. They recover the grains from the field and separate them from the rest of the crop material, the material other than grain (MOG), which is dumped back on the field. The history of grain harvesting is described impressively by Quick and Buchele [1]. Recent combine harvester development is represented by Kutzbach [2] in the LAV Yearbook Agricultural Engineering. Since the transition from hand harvest to the use of combine harvesters, productivity of harvesting has increased from 10 kg/man-hour in 1800 to about 60,000 kg/man-hour with stripper header today, [3, 4] and losses are reduced to as low as 1%3%. Different crop properties and different harvest conditions make great demands on combines. The combine has to match these demands by design, and the driver has to continually adjust the combine to the optimum for each crop and harvest condition.

(Download PDF)    (Export to EndNotes)