Click on “Download PDF” for the PDF version or on the title for the HTML version.


If you are not an ASABE member or if your employer has not arranged for access to the full-text, Click here for options.

GROUND WATER QUALITY NEAR THE EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org

Citation:  Watershed Management to Meet Water Quality Standards and Emerging TMDL (Total Maximum Daily Load) Proceedings of the Third Conference 5-9 March 2005 (Atlanta, Georgia USA) Publication Date 5 March 2005  701P0105.(doi:10.13031/2013.18134)
Authors:   M. R. Savabi, D. Shinde and N. Cockshutt
Keywords:   Groundwater water quality, Everglades National Park, agriculture, monitoring

Non-point source water pollutants resulting from agricultural areas have been implicated as a source of water quality degradation in South Florida, USA. The nutrients loading from agricultural and urban areas have increased nutrient concentrations, particularly phosphorus at the Everglades National Park (ENP), Florida. A farm near the Everglades National Park was selected for this study. Ground water table fluctuation and quality have been monitored for two years in a one-mile transect. In addition, water quality of the main canal, located at the end of the transect was monitored on weekly basis. Due to high transmissivity of the Biscayne aquifer, there is high correlation between the concentration of N and P in the ground water monitoring wells and the canal. The results indicated that during the summer season (wet season) the quality of water in the agriculture area is correlated with the water quality in the canal. However, during the winter season (dry season) there is correlation between the nutrient content of the wells located in the agriculture area and the nutrient content of the main canal. In south Florida, the growing season and the application time of agro-chemicals for most vegetables is during the winter, therefore, the source of observed nutrients in the main canal should not be from the agricultural area in South Florida.

(Download PDF)    (Export to EndNotes)