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FECAL COLIFORM MODELING IN SMALL COASTAL WATERS USING A LINKED WATERSHED AND TIDAL PRISM WATER QUALITY MODEL: A PRELIMINARY STUDY IN JARRETT BAY, NORTH CAROLINA

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org

Citation:  Watershed Management to Meet Water Quality Standards and Emerging TMDL (Total Maximum Daily Load) Proceedings of the Third Conference 5-9 March 2005 (Atlanta, Georgia USA) Publication Date 5 March 2005  701P0105.(doi:10.13031/2013.18093)
Authors:   T. Wang, J. Shen, S. Sun, and H. V. Wang
Keywords:   Fecal coliform, TMDL, LSPC++, TPWQM, Jarrett Bay

Elevated levels of fecal coliform bacteria impair many shellfish growing waters along the US South Atlantic Coast. Under Section 303 (d) of the Clean Water Act, they are required to undergo development of a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) based on fecal coliform criteria. In calculating the TMDL for the targeted water body, a single segment steady-state volumetric method has been used. This method is relatively simple and may work well for small and wellmixed water bodies, but it is not applicable for large and complex ones, especially for those areas with multiple branches which are significantly influenced by tidal mixing. In this study, we are using a linked watershed-water quality modeling approach to simulate the entire tracking of fecal coliform including its source, transport, and fate in the coastal environment. The Loading Simulation Program C++ (LSPC) is used for the watershed loading calculation, which can continuously simulate the hydrology, fecal coliform deposition, decay, and transport for different land use categories based on its source contributions and soil characteristics in the watershed. The calculated loading is dynamically linked to the Tidal Prism Water Quality Model (TPWQM), which further simulates the fate and transport of fecal coliform in coastal waters. The approach is a sound rationale and can better simulate realistic conditions. A case study for Jarrett Bay, North Carolina is presented to illustrate the capability of the modeling system.

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