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Using Low Temperatures to Control Indian Meal Moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), in Stored Corn

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org

Citation:  Paper number  036154,  2003 ASAE Annual Meeting . (doi: 10.13031/2013.15416)
Authors:   N. Kaliyan, W. F. Wilcke, R. V. Morey, M. A. Carrillo, C. A. Cannon
Keywords:   Indian meal moth, Stored corn, Insect management, Headspace ventilation

To develop practical weather-based headspace ventilation management strategies to control Indian meal moth in stored shelled corn (Zea mays L.) bins for locations in the north- and east-central states of the U.S., historical weather data were analyzed to estimate the mean number of hours below certain critical threshold temperatures for the months of December, January, and February and they were presented as contour maps. Minneapolis - St. Paul, MN weather data were analyzed to estimate the mean frequency of occurrences of consecutive hours of temperatures below certain threshold values for the months of December, January, and February. The application of these two weather parameters for the control of stored grain insects was discussed. An existing temperature prediction model was modified to simulate the temperatures of headspace-air and grain in the upper surface during mechanically ventilated and unventilated conditions. The model was used to simulate the temperatures of corn stored in Minneapolis- St. Paul, MN during December, January, and February. Predicted temperatures of headspace-air and grain near the top surface were analyzed to estimate the mean temperatures, mean number of hours and mean frequency of consecutive hours occurrences below 10 and 20oC during the simulation period. The results suggest that in Minneapolis- St. Paul, MN, cold-acclimated diapausing Indian meal moth larvae could easily be controlled by mechanical ventilation of headspace during winter months. Further research is warranted to develop site-specific headspace ventilation strategies to control Indian meal moth and other stored grain insects.

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