Click on “Download PDF” for the PDF version or on the title for the HTML version.


If you are not an ASABE member or if your employer has not arranged for access to the full-text, Click here for options.

REFRIGERATING WOODY CUTTINGS HELPS EXTEND PLANT DORMANCY: A PROMISING TREATMENT TO EXTEND THE CONSTRUCTION PERIOD FOR BIOTECHNICAL STREAMBANK STABILIZATION IN WARM REGIONS

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org

Citation:  Paper number  032128,  2003 ASAE Annual Meeting . (doi: 10.13031/2013.14007) @2003
Authors:   Ming-Han Li, Harlow C. Landphair
Keywords:   Dormancy, biotechnical streambank stabilization, black willow

Planting live woody cuttings such as willow or poplar cuttings to stabilize streambanks is one important technique in biotechnical engineering. To be effective, the cuttings must be harvested and planted during the dormant periods, normally the wintertime. This requirement may not cause a problem in construction scheduling for regions with cold, long winters but will be a challenge for regions with short, rainy winters. This is because the construction of streambank stabilization must begin at the stream bottom. Rainy winters make streams flow more frequently, which makes the biotechnical construction and scheduling very difficult.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of extending dormancy of willow cuttings for biotechnical engineering in warm regions. Approximately three hundred black willow (Salix nigra) cuttings were harvested during the dormant periods (February 2001) and then stored in a 4.4oC (40oF) refrigerator with cut ends submerged in water. In each month in March, April and May 2001, one-third of cuttings were removed from the refrigerator and planted in a field embankment.

One year after planting the survival rates of these three sets of plantings (March, April and May) were 81.3%, 43.6% and 43.8%, respectively. These survival rates were considered effective by comparing with the satisfactory survival rate documented in the literature: 40-70%. This finding may provide a practical solution to the field application in warm regions because the construction period can be extended for up to three months with the refrigeration treatment to cuttings.

(Download PDF)    (Export to EndNotes)