Click on “Download PDF” for the PDF version or on the title for the HTML version.


If you are not an ASABE member or if your employer has not arranged for access to the full-text, Click here for options.

A MECHANISTIC MODEL OF FUGITIVE EMISSIONS OF PARTICULATE MATTER FROM CATTLE FEEDYARDS, PART I: INTRODUCTORY

Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org

Citation:  Pp. 257-266 in Air Pollution from Agricultural Operations III, Proceedings of the 12-15 October 2003 Conference (Research Triangle Park, North Carolina USA), Publication Date 12 October 2003.  701P1403.(doi:10.13031/2013.15517)
Authors:   B. W. Auvermann
Keywords:   Fugitive dust, Feedyards, Emission factors, Mechanistic model

We present preliminary results of a bench-scale simulation of the mechanics of dust emissions from a cattle feedyard surface. The experimental apparatus simulated hoof action by dropping steel weights of standardized geometry onto an uncompacted layer of dried, sieved feedyard manure, varying the kinetic energy of the falling weight by adjusting the height from which it was dropped. The dust emitted by the impact of the falling weight on the uncompacted manure was captured on glass fiber filters, and its mass was determined by routine gravimetry. As expected, the mass of dust emitted by the hoof-action simulation was approximately proportional to the kinetic energy of the falling weight. In addition, for a given kinetic energy of a falling weight, the mass of dust emitted was influenced by the depth of the uncompacted manure layer onto which it fell, although the nature and physical meaning of that relationship are unclear. Additional experiments planned for the near future will illuminate the influence of bulk density and moisture content on the intrinsic dust susceptibility of the loose manure layer, as well as the relative contributions of anterior and posterior hoof action to the total dust emissions. The bench-top simulator provides a practical means of screening mulches and other surface treatments for their potential to suppress fugitive dust emissions from cattle feedyards and open-lot dairies. (Download PDF)    (Export to EndNotes)